Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: SocStudSoSt 200  Introduction to Social Studies


Term:  Fall, 2013

Instructor:     Tony Filipovitch, 126 Morris Hall, 507-389-5035 (office), 507-388-2264 (home)

Office Hours:  My office hours are posted here.  I am available in my office at those times (or other times by appointment).  I also check my e-mail daily (usually several times during the day), and have an answering machine on both my home and office phone.  There is no reason to flounder around, unsure of what “he wants” or confused about what you are doing; and even if everything is going fine with the coursework, there is more to learning than completing the assignments.  I encourage you to visit me, in person or at a distance by phone or e-mail, many times during the course.

Instructional Management System & Communication Protocols: 

·         The course will use D2L as the instructional management system.  Grade rosters and other course management issues will be handled through that site. 

·         The software for this course will be PC-based Microsoft Office and Internet Explorer, or compatibles.  I prefer to receive e-mail and course submissions to my e-mail address (not to D2L), and I can only open Microsoft Word or text files (if you are using, say, WordPerfect, make sure to send any files to me in .txt or .rtf format). 

·         I will communicate with you using your official MSU e-mail address; if this is not your preferred e-mail provider, make sure you have set your MSU e-mail account to forward to your preferred address (instructions are available from  the help desk at help@mnsu.edu or 507-389-6654).

·         I generally will reply to e-mails within 48 hours (give me an additional 24 hours over the weekends), unless I have notified the class through D2L that I expect to be away from my computer (e.g., when I am attending a national conference).  If you do not hear from me within that time, please resend your question or comment as it may have been lost.

Text:

Hillary Wackman & Nancy Wagner.  2013.  Northern Lights, 3rd. Ed. (Student Edition).  MN Historical Society Press.

Teachers College Columbia University, 2012.  Understanding Fiscal Responsibility (Online edition)  http://understandingfiscalresponsibility.org/

Course Overview:

The purpose of this course is to initiate formal preparation for teaching secondary social studies.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will

  1. Begin to develop a professional portfolio using the Web
  2. Examine critical integrating concepts for the social studies classroom, including the role of critical thinking, paradigms, spiral learning, connected learning, inquiry and discovery.
  3. Develop and deliver standards-based teaching strategies.
  4. Use knowledge of current events to create applications for teaching social studies.
  5. Apply your understanding of social phenomena in a multiple perspectives learning activity

 

Students will address the following Minnesota Board of Teaching and National Council for the Social Studies Teacher Education Standards by applying their understanding of:

  1. Culture & Cultural Diversity:  How human beings create, learn, and adapt culture
  2. Time, Continuity & Change:  Historical roots based on what things were like in the past and how things change and develop over time.
  3. People, Places & Environments:  The world within and beyond personal locations.
  4. Individual Development & Identity:  Personal identity as shaped by an individual’s culture, by groups, and by institutional influences.
  5. Individuals, Groups & Institutions:  How institutions are formed, what controls and influences them, how institutions control and influence individuals and culture, and how institutions can be maintained or changed.
  6. Power, Authority and Governance:  The historical development of structures of power, authority and governance and their evolving functions in contemporary United States society and other parts of the world.
  7. Production, Distribution, and Consumption:  How people organize for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.
  8. Science, Technology and Society:  The relationship among science, technology, and society
  9. Global Connections:  The relationship ob global connections among world societies to global interdependence.
  10. Civic Ideals and Practice:  That civic ideals and practices of citizenship are critical to full participation in society and are the central purpose of the social studies.
  11. Native American History and Culture

Requirements:

Class Meetings:

Class time will be a mix of lecture, discussion, activities, and student presentations.  You are expected to come to class, and come prepared to discuss the material assigned for each week.  Also, throughout much of the course there will be a current events quiz at some time during the class.  Material for the quiz will be taken from the StarTribune, although you might get a boost from NPR’s “Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me.”

Website/Portfolio:

You will need to establish an online professional portfolio.  You will continue to develop your portfolio throughout your studies here at MSU, and most likely will continue it once you are in your profession.  We recommend MnSCU’s e-Folio site, although you may use other websites if you get prior permission.  The instructions for the Portfolio are found in the Course Calendar.

 

Lesson Plans:

Using the template provided in the Course Calendar, you will write three lesson plans, each from a different Strand from the NCSS Standards or the MN Native American Performance Expectations (you may choose which strands).  These lesson plans will give you practice both in the construction of lessons and in covering the breadth of the social studies content areas.  The first lesson plan will be based on one of the lessons from the Teachers College Columbia University series; the second and third will be based on a chapter from Northern Lights. 

Multiple Perspectives Learning Activity

You will develop a complete lesson plan which:

 

You will:

 

Course Calendar

Date

Topic

Readings/Assignments

Activities & Integrating Concepts

8/28

Becoming a Social Studies Teacher:

a.  Introduction &  Writing a Lesson Plan

NCSS;How to Build a Student for the 21st Century,” Time, 12/18/06, 50-56; Library Guide for Education

Writing instructions—nouns & verbs

 

9/4

b.   Thinking like a social studies teacher:  Standards-based teaching

c.  Inquiry & Discovery:  spiralling instruction” & “connected learning”

MN Standards; TPA Framework ; Bloom's Taxonomy; Inquiry & discovery;  “Engaging Students”  (in D2L Contents); C3 National Standards

Standards, results, evaluation,  curriculum, instruction

**Current events quiz

9/11

d.  Portfolios & Social Studies Profession (Social Studies Panel)

Create your portfolio

MSU SoSt Portfolios

Portfolio Evaluation Criteria

**Current events quiz

9/18

Critical Thinking

Content & academic language

Manfra, “Critical Inquiry” (in D2L Contents); Critical Thinking on the Web; Critical Thinking in the Curriculum; Mutual Indignation Society; Text, Investigation 1

**Current events quiz

9/25

Preliminary review of first lesson topic

10/2

Thinking in Paradigms

a.       The business of paradigms

b.      Differentiating Instruction

 

Perspectives & frames of reference; Johnson, “Template of the Reporter” (in D2L Contents); Robert Hanvey, “An Attainable Global Perspective”; Text:  Investigation 7

**Current events quiz

**Portfolio due

10/9

c.       Multiple perspectives

Christensen, “Conducting Policy” & Kurzman, “Reasonable Disagreement”  (in D2L Contents ); “Our Mutual Indignation Society”; "Living with partisanship";

Text, Investigation 9

“Two Women”

**Current events quiz

10/16

First Lesson Plan--discussion

 

Assessment rubric

10/23

Geography—Physical, Cultural, and GIS

MAGE; US Census Population Pyramids; Chloropleth Maps; Climographs; Text, Investigation 19

**Current events quiz

First Lesson Plan due

10/30

Second Lesson Plan--discussion

 

 

11/6

History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Civics—Teaching local government

Stanford History Education Group; World History for Us All; The Uses of History; Iroquois Constitution; Adriaen Van der Donck; Van der Donck’s Description (D2L); History Right and Left; When History Is Held Hostage to Tests; Teachers College “American History” and “World History”; Text, Investigation 6

Center for Civic Education; Teaching the Local Community; A Framework for Policy Analysis; Teachers College “Civcs/Government”; Text, Investigation 13 & 18

**Current events quiz

Second Lesson Plan due

11/13

Third Lesson Plan--discussion

**Current events quiz

11/20

Economics

EconEdLink; Workers’ Wages; American Pie; Paying higher taxes; The New Normal; Health Care; Teachers College “Economics”; Text, Investigation 10

**Current events quiz

Third Lesson Plan due

12/4

Multiple Perspectives Lesson Plan--review

 

Multiple Perspectives Learning Activity

**Current events quiz

12/9

Multiple Perspectives Plan due; Course evaluation due

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Expectations:

Grading:

There are 100 points for the course, divided as follows:

            1) Current Events Quizzes (10 @ 3)                               30

            2) Web site/Portfolio                                                       20

3) Lesson Plans (3 @ 10)                                                30

4) Multiple Perspectives Project                                     20

           

The final grade may be based on a curve, but students can expect at least an A if they achieve 90, a B with 80, etc.

Other Matters:

All assignments are due on the assigned date. There will be no makeups except for very unusual circumstances (a medical excuse will require a doctor’s slip). No extensions or makeups are allowed without prior permission.

Written reports are expected to be free of grammatical, spelling, and content errors.  It should be submitted in typewritten, standard formats (APA, MLA, URSI Style Sheets).  You must familiarize yourself with the University’s Academic Honesty Policy.  I encourage you to draw on the ideas of others—but you must also identify when you do so (you gain “brownie points” for citing the work of others!).  Plagiarism is a serious breach of academic behavior and will result in an F for the course.

I will help you in whatever manner humanly possible.  However, once the semester is over, there is not a great deal I can do.  If there is something that you don’t understand, are having problems with, or need help on, please get in touch with me as early as possible.

Every attempt will be made to accommodate qualified students with disabilities.  If you area student with a documented disability, please contact me as early in the semester as possible to discuss the necessary accommodations, and/or contact the Disability Services Office at 507-389-2825 (V) or 1-800-627-3529 (MRS/TTY).

Bibliography

There are a number of interesting and useful journals and websites that might help you dig deeper into the issues raised in this course.  Among them are:

 

The Social Studies [D16.3.S65]

Social Education [H62.A1S6]

Theory and Research in Social Education [H1.T47]

Journal of Economic Education [H62.5.U5.J6]

Journal of Geography [G1.J87]

The History Teacher [D1.H8177]

Teaching Sociology [HM1.T43]

 

General

Minnesota Academic Standards in History and Social Studies

Curriculum Standards for Social Studies

McREL

Social Studies Development Center

Social Studies Classroom

PBS and PBS Online NewsHour Extra

Education Week

MarcoPolo Network

 

History

Nationals Standards for History

History Channel

American Memory (Library of Congress)

Digital History

 

Geography

National Geographic Education Guide

US Census International Data

World Climate

Cartography of the Anthropocene

 

Civics

National Standards for Civics and Government

MCMA Educational Initiatives

The Civics Institite

 

Economics

EconEdLink

State Standards for Economics

 

Others

Psychology Suggested Standards 

Online Directory for Sociology Education

 

 

“Teacher-Designed Social Studies Websites,” C. Frederick Risinger, Social Education, 2004, 68(7), 464-465, lists:

Ms. LeBeau’s HomePage

Mr. Dowling’s Electronic Passport

Mr. D’s Website

Mr. Dziubek’s Virtual Classroom

Ms. Raff’s History Classroom

Mr. Diaz’s Home Page

Mr. Stultz’s School Site

Mr. Donn’s Ancient History Page

Awesome Library


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© 2004 A.J.Filipovitch
Revised 9 August 2013